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Elk WILDLIFE DIVISION
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Wolf Program Updates

Media inquiries about Oregon wolves:
Contact Michelle Dennehy, Michelle.N.Dennehy@state.or.us
(503) 947 6022 / cell (503) 931-2748

xReceive Wolf Program Updates by E-mail

2014

September 5, 2014   Genetic results on OR7’s mate and pups

ODFW received University of Idaho’s report on scat samples collected in May and July. The samples were taken from the area being used by wolf OR7, his female mate and pups in the southwest Cascades. As expected, the samples identified OR7’s mate and two of the pups as wolves. The results do not indicate specifically where OR7’s mate was born, but show that she is related to other wolves in NE Oregon (Snake River and Minam packs). The two pup scats also identified the pups as offspring of OR7 and his new mate.

July 17, 2014   New wolf activity, depredation in Chesnimnus Unit (Wallowa County)

ODFW has confirmed new wolf activity by previously unconfirmed wolves in the Chesnimnus Unit (Wallowa County). The finding was made last night when an investigation confirmed that a domestic calf was killed by wolves in the Cougar Creek Area, on national forest lands (Wallowa Whitman NF) approximately 30 miles north of Enterprise. ODFW had received irregular reports of wolf activity in this area but this is the first recent information showing evidence of resident activity by  more than a single wolf.

At least two to three wolves were believed to be in the area where the calf was killed. These wolves are not believed to be part of any previously known wolf pack. ODFW is now working to gather more information on these new wolves, including determination of their reproductive status, and will attempt to radio-collar individual wolves in this group.

June 10, 2014   New Area of Known Wolf ActivityOR26, Unnamed Pack In Mt Emily Unit

A new Area of Known Wolf Activity has been designated by ODFW in the southern portion of the Mt. Emily Unit in Umatilla County. OR26 is a male wolf which was recently captured by ODFW biologists and fitted with a GPS collar. Initial data from this wolf indicates that he is paired and likely has pups, but further field surveys are needed to confirm. Repeated use of the area over a period of time indicates that wolves have become established and are not simply dispersing wolves.  However, ODFW has little data regarding the specifics of this group.

June 7, 2014   Mt. Emily Pack female collared

ODFW successfully trapped and GPS-collared a yearling female (OR28) of the Mt. Emily Pack. The 72-pound black wolf was released in excellent condition and is the first radio-collared wolf in this pack. The Mt Emily Pack was first discovered in 2013 and is comprised of four known adult wolves.  The GPS collar will allow better understanding of the pack’s use area. This marks the 28th radio-collared wolf in Oregon, and is the first wolf collared from this pack.

June 4, 2014   Pups for wolf OR7

Wolf OR7 and a mate have produced offspring in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains, wildlife biologists confirmed this week. In early May, biologists suspected that OR7, originally from northeast Oregon, had a mate in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest when remote cameras captured several images of what appeared to be a black female wolf in the same area. More information.

May 12, 2014      Wolf OR7 may have found a mate

OR7, a wolf originally from northeast Oregon, may have found a mate in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains. More information can be accessed and photos can be viewed here.

March 11, 2014

The final 2013 Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Annual Report is available online. It includes the 2013 update for Oregon’s Wolf Population. ODFW documented a minimum of 64 wolves in 8 packs, including 4 breeding pairs for 2013 (compared to 46 wolves in 6 packs with 6 breeding pairs in 2012).

A research section has been added to the wolf webpages. The page is based on the Wolf Literature Review and Research Recommendations presented to the Fish and Wildlife Commission in March 2013. ODFW has also initiated a partnership with Oregon State University to provide a Ph. D. student to study wolf-cougar interactions and wolf predation rates on northeastern Oregon ungulates. This project is expected to be completed in 2018.

Finally, additional wolf photos from 2013 and 2014 have been added to the wolf photo gallery.

February 25, 2014

The draft 2013 Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Annual Report is available online. It includes the 2013 update for Oregon’s Wolf Population. ODFW staff will brief the Fish and Wildlife Commission on the report on Friday, March 7 at the Commission meeting in Salem at ODFW Headquarters.

February 4, 2014

New Area of Known Wolf Activity – Unnamed Wolves in Catherine Creek and Keating Units

A new Area of Known Wolf Activity has been designated by ODFW in the southern Catherine Creek Unit and the northern Keating Unit. Tracks of five wolves were first documented by ODFW in late December in the Medical Springs area, after the department followed up a track report from an area landowner.  Since December, the group’s tracks were relocated three times, including last week in northern Baker County.  The repeated use of the area over a period of time indicates that wolves have become established and are not simply dispersing wolves.  However, ODFW has little data regarding the specifics of this group (e.g. origin, reproductive status, homerange). Future monitoring efforts will focus on more location data and radio-collaring.

ODFW Collars OR4 – Again

The breeding male of the Imnaha pack (OR4) was aerially darted and radio-collared by ODFW on Feb. 1, 2014.  The wolf’s previous GPS collar quit functioning in late December and this was the first time the wolf was in an area where he could be safely darted.  The new GPS collar is the fourth applied to this particular wolf. While ODFW would not normally re-collar an individual wolf so many times, this particular wolf’s collar has been helpful with managing depredation in the area.  “ODFW has plenty of location information about the Imnaha pack, but this wolf is important to continue to track in order to assist area livestock producers facing depredation,” said Russ Morgan, ODFW wolf coordinator.


2013

October 28, 2013

Young Umatilla River wolves collared after incidental capture

ODFW biologists radio-collared and released two young wolves in a forested area east of Weston, Ore. on Oct. 26. 

The 55-pound male and a 50-pound female are both young-of-the-year members of the Umatilla River Pack in Umatilla County.  

Both wolves were incidentally trapped on private land by a licensed trapper who was intending to trap coyotes. They were trapped at the same time in two separate foot-hold traps in close proximity. The trapper followed regulations and immediately reported the situation.   

ODFW biologists were able to quickly respond and safely collar and release the wolves. The two wolves are the third and fourth incidental captures recorded in Oregon. In the two previous incidental captures, the trappers also reported the incidents and the wolves were safely released.

The Umatilla River wolves were fitted with lighter-weight GPS collars ideal for younger wolves. These types of collars collect fewer locations than regular GPS collars, but this pack already has a GPS-collared adult providing location data. The GPS collars on these younger wolves should prove most useful when the wolves disperse.


October 16, 2013

ODFW has confirmed a wolf depredation on a calf by the Snake River wolf pack (Wallowa County, Oregon), the first confirmed depredation by this pack.

A summary of the investigation (10/15 Wallowa County)


September 6, 2013

Change to Umatilla River Qualifying Incident

After further review, ODFW has rescinded the decision to qualify the Aug. 23, 2013 confirmed depredation by the Umatilla River pack as a Qualifying Incident under new wolf management rules (OAR 635-110-0010(8)(a-c).

Under the new rules, ODFW needs to develop and post a Conflict Deterrence Plan within 14 days of the first depredation by a pack. In this case, the Umatilla River Pack Conflict Deterrence Plan did not meet the 14-day deadline. The decision does not change the original confirmation that a wolf or wolves were the cause of death of the goat in this instance.

This change reduces the number of Qualifying Incidents for the Umatilla River Pack from two to one. ODFW only considers lethal control for depredating wolves when there are four Qualifying Incidents within a six-month time period.


August 30, 2013

Conflict Deterrence Plan released for Umatilla River Pack  

ODFW has posted the Conflict Deterrence Plan for the Umatilla River Pack. ODFW had many discussions with livestock producers in the Umatilla River Pack area about the appropriate non-lethal measures to minimize conflict with wolves. These discussions led to development of this plan and its provisions are being implemented by many producers already. 

Under new wolf management rules, ODFW and livestock producers are required to develop and publicly disclose Conflict Deterrence  Plans in Areas of Depredating Wolves. The Conflict Deterrence Plan could be updated from time to time based on changing conditions, pack behavior, knowledge about wolf management and comments by landowners, livestock producers and other relevant interests.  To be notified of changes to the Conflict Deterrence Plan, subscribe to receive changes to the Wolf-Livestock section.


August 27, 2013

ODFW has confirmed two additional depredations—an injured cow by the Imnaha pack (8/22/13), and a dead goat by the Umatilla River pack (8/23/13). Investigation summaries for these depredations are posted on the website.

The Umatilla River pack depredation is a “qualifying incident” (see report), meaning the landowner was using appropriate preventative measures to minimize wolf-livestock conflict. (ODFW has rescinded decision to qualify Aug. 23 incident; see Sept. 6 entry above for more information.) ODFW is waiting on information from the livestock producers to determine if the two confirmed Imnaha Pack depredations (from 8/21 and 8/22) are qualifying incidents.


August 23, 2013

Depredation by the Imnaha wolf pack

ODFW has confirmed a depredation by the Imnaha wolf pack

ODFW is working to determine if the depredation counts as a “qualifying incident” toward a lethal control decision. (For a depredation to qualify, the affected landowner must have been using at least one preventive measure and removed all reasonably accessible unnatural attractants on his/her property at least seven days prior to the incident.)  If this depredation qualifies, it will be the third qualifying depredation within the past six months.

Under new rules agreed to in a settlement with conservation groups and the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association earlier this year, ODFW does not consider lethal control before there are at least four qualifying incidents in a six-month time frame.


August 12, 2013

2nd Wenaha wolf has died from parvovirus

Lab results show that a dead Wenaha Pack wolf pup recently found had died as a result of parvovirus. The carcass of the pup was discovered by ODFW on July 30th while staff was conducting routine surveys. This marks the second wolf death attributed to parvovirus in Oregon (the first was a 55-pound female yearling, also from the Wenaha pack, discovered in May 2013). Other apparently healthy pups were observed when the carcass of the pup was found on July 30, so the extent of the disease within this pack is unknown. 

Parvovirus outbreaks have been documented in wolf populations throughout the western United States. In some areas parvovirus has caused short term declines in wolf populations by reducing the number of surviving pups. Long-term effects of the disease are less understood, but are generally not expected to threaten overall conservation of the species (though it may reduce the rate of population growth). ODFW staff will continue to monitor survival of the remaining pups as the year progresses.


Mt. Emily wolf pups
Remote camera photo from July 21, 2013, documenting three pups in the newly formed Mt Emily pack.
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

July 30, 2013

Mt Emily wolves, other wolf packs have pups

ODFW has documented that the two wolves discovered earlier this year in the Mt Emily Unit have reproduced.  Monitoring cameras documented three pups by this pair (photo), though there could be more.  The pair was first found in April 2013 in Union County in the Mt Emily Unit northwest of Summerville, Ore. 

ODFW has now confirmed reproduction in seven known packs this year (Imnaha, Minam, Mt Emily, Snake River, Umatilla River, Walla Walla, and Wenaha), though the exact number of pups is not yet known in all of the packs.


July 19, 2013

On Friday July 12, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission passed new Oregon Administrative Rules to manage wolves in Oregon. The rules reflect the outcome of negotiations between Oregon Wild, Cascadia Wildlands, the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association and ODFW after the settlement of a lawsuit. View the entire new rule.

Changes have been made to the ODFW wolf webpage to inform livestock producers and interested parties about the rule changes and how they affect the use of non-lethal measures to reduce livestock depredation. The Wolves and Livestock section enables individuals to sign up for emails to keep them current on changes to wolf activity maps, conflict deterrence plans and other issues concerning wolf-livestock interactions.


May 30, 2013

Wolf OR19 died from complications of canine parvovirus

Preliminary laboratory results, conducted at Oregon State University Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, indicate that OR19, the wolf found dead by ODFW biologists on May 19, died of complications of canine parvovirus. The highly contagious and often fatal disease is common among domestic dogs, and can spill over into wild canids such as coyotes, foxes, and wolves. Domestic dogs are normally vaccinated for the disease but wild animals are not. Parvovirus has been documented in wild canids in other areas of the country and most commonly occurs in pups. It is unknown at this time if other wolves in Oregon are affected with the virus, but biologists will continue to monitor for signs of the disease throughout the summer.

This is the first documented case of parvovirus in Oregon wolves, though outbreaks have been well documented in wolf populations throughout the western United States. In some areas it has caused short term declines in wolf populations by reducing the number of surviving pups. Long-term effects are less understood, but are generally not expected to threaten overall conservation of the species (though it may reduce the rate of population growth).


May 28, 2013

Settlement of Oregon Court of Appeals case

In the fall of 2011, ODFW’s authority to take (lethally remove) wolves under the State Endangered Species Act was challenged by a temporary restraining order filed in the Oregon Court of Appeals by Cascadia Wildlands, Oregon Wild and the Center for Biological Diversity.

Over the past year, these three organizations, ODFW and the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association have been in talks to try to settle the case outside of Court. The Center for Biological Diversity withdrew from these negotiations this past winter.

Last week, the remaining parties agreed in principle to a combination of rule changes and legislation that once enacted, will moot the court case. The key changes to the current rules regarding lethal control of wolves are:

  • Before ODFW can use lethal control against wolves, it must confirm four qualifying incidents within a six-month time frame (previously it was two depredation incidents and no specific timeframe).
  • Requires the development and public disclosure of wolf-livestock conflict deterrence plans that identify non-lethal measures for implementation by landowners.
  • Requires that these non-lethal measures be implemented prior to a depredation for the depredation incident to count towards lethal control.
  • Puts in rule that any ODFW lethal control decision is valid for 45-days (previously the timeframe for an ODFW lethal control decision was not standardized in rule; 45 days is consistent with what other western states have implemented).

The new temporary rules are online here http://www.dfw.state.or.us/OARs/110.pdf The Fish and Wildlife Commission will be asked to ratify these rules at their June 7 meeting in Tigard and make them permanent at their July meeting. “We are pleased the parties were able to come to an agreement,” said Ron Anglin, ODFW wildlife division administrator. “We look forward to finalizing both the rules and the legislation so the case can be fully settled and we can move forward on wolf conservation and management.”

May 22, 2013

Minam Pack female collared

On May 16, 2013 ODFW successfully trapped and GPS-collared an adult breeding female of the Minam Pack. The 81-pound wolf was in excellent condition and is the first radio-collared wolf in this pack. The Minam Pack was first discovered in 2012 and early information about the pack suggested that it occurred mostly within the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Managers expect that the GPS collar will allow better understanding of the pack’s use areas. This marks the 20th radio-collared wolf in Oregon.

Confirmed depredations by Imnaha pack

On May 15, 2013 a yearling cow was confirmed by ODFW to have been killed by wolves of the Imnaha pack.  Evidence of at least two wolves was found at the site. In addition, GPS locations from OR4’s radio-collar confirmed that OR4 was present. On May 10, 2013 ODFW also confirmed that a small calf in the same general area had received wolf bite injuries on a hind leg. The calf was expected to survive. These are the third and fourth confirmed wolf depredation incidents by the Imnaha Pack in 2013.

Loss of collared Wenaha female

On May 11, 2013 a 55-pound yearling female wolf (OR19) from the Wenaha pack was trapped and released with a GPS radio-collar. She was caught in the Sled Springs unit where some members of the Wenaha pack have been located for more than a month. The capture went well and the wolf appeared healthy and unharmed. Following the capture, the movement data from the wolf appeared normal.  However, late on May 17 the collar sent out a mortality message – a message which indicates the collar had been stationary for an extended period of time.  Radio collar mortality signals do not always mean mortality, but on Sunday May 19 ODFW investigated the area and found that the wolf had died. The cause of death is unknown, but we do not suspect foul play at this time.  Even so, the animal is being independently examined in an effort to learn more of the cause of death. 

New pair of wolves in Mt Emily Unit

A new pair of wolves was discovered in the eastern portion of the Mt Emily Unit (Union County) in early April 2013. Field surveys which immediately followed, combined with information shared by area landowners showed that the pair – probably a male and female – visited several private land areas near the Grande Ronde Valley. More recently, however, evidence (tracks) has shown that the pair may have moved to higher elevation forest areas. Continued survey efforts will be conducted to gather more information on the pair.

Sheep depredation in northern Umatilla County

On May 21, ODFW confirmed that 6 sheep were depredated by wolves which resulted in four dead (3 lambs, 1 ewe), one injured (ram), and one missing (lamb).  Wolf tracks were found in the pasture of the dead sheep, and radio-collar data showed that at least one wolf of the Umatilla River Pack was in the area on the night of the depredation. Evidence gathered showed a similar pattern of attack as the depredation events in 2012 in this same general area. 


March 18, 2013

Snake River Pack wolves collared

On March 14, ODFW biologists collared and released two wolves from the Snake River pack in a helicopter capture operation. One of them (OR15) had been collared last August as a pup; biologists replaced his VHF collar with a GPS collar. The other wolf, OR18, is a year older than OR15 and was given a GPS collar also. These collars will enable biologists to better track this pack in a remote part of Oregon.


March 13, 2013

Wolf OR7 back in Oregon

Wolf OR7 crossed the state border into southwest Klamath County, Ore. sometime yesterday evening. He first crossed into California on Dec. 28, 2011. More information here: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/nongame/wolf/ and http://californiagraywolf.wordpress.com/

ODFW does not post daily location information on OR7 or any GPS-collared wolf. Wolves throughout Oregon are protected by the state Endangered Species Act. West of Hwys 395-78-95, wolves are also protected by the federal ESA.

OR7 may cross back into California and use areas in both states. ODFW will continue to monitor his location and coordinate with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and California Fish and Game.


Minam Wolf
Minam Wolf
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

February 28, 2013

New Imnaha Pack collar; Minam/Upper Minam River determined to be same pack

On Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 ODFW biologists radio-collared a new Imnaha Pack wolf (OR17).  The 76-pound young female wolf was captured inadvertently by a local trapper who immediately notified ODFW when he discovered the wolf. ODFW was able to collar and then safely release the wolf in good condition.

Under Oregon Furbearer Regulations, trappers should contact ODFW immediately if a wolf or other endangered animal is trapped. The trapper did exactly what he was supposed to do in this case.

ODFW has recently added another breeding pair to its 2012 population estimate. Recent winter (February) surveys revealed that the Minam pack has two pups. Also, new genetic evidence from scats collected in January indicate that the Minam and Upper Minam River wolves are from the same pack, hereafter referred to as the Minam Pack. Based on this new information, ODFW is revising its earlier estimate of the Oregon wolf population to six known packs (all breeding pairs) and a total of 46 wolves.


January 29, 2013

ODFW confirmed a livestock depredation by the Imnaha wolf pack yesterday in Wallowa County. Summaries of this investigation and others.

Imnaha Wolf Pup
Imnaha Wolf Pup
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

January 16, 2013

Oregon’s wolf count for 2012

Oregon’s minimum wolf count for 2012 is 53 wolves, including seven packs and at least five breeding pairs. (A pack is four wolves that travel together in winter. A breeding pair is two adult wolves that produce at least two pups that survive through Dec. 31 of the year of their birth.) More information.

The Oregon wolf population is determined each winter and is based on wolves that staff has verified through direct evidence (sightings, tracks, remote camera footage). The actual number of wolves in Oregon is likely greater than this minimum estimate, and the 2012 estimate may change as ODFW gains additional information over the winter.


2012

December 19, 2012

On December 19th the yearling wolf OR16, which had recently dispersed from the Walla Walla pack, crossed the Snake River into Idaho. The 85 pound male was captured north of Elgin, Oregon on November 1 and was fitted with a GPS collar which allowed  managers to quickly determine that the young wolf was part of the Walla Walla pack in northern Umatilla County. Dispersal of young  wolves away from their natal pack into new areas is a normal part of wolf ecology and this is the second radio-collared wolf to disperse from Oregon into Idaho.

November 16, 2012

OR16 belongs to Walla Walla Pack

Initial data from OR16 (radio-collared on 11/1/2012) shows that he is a Walla Walla pack wolf.  Satellite downloads show him travelling with OR10, another yearling from the Walla Walla pack.

DNA results for Wenaha samples

DNA analysis of wolf scats in the Wenaha pack territory confirms that OR12  is the breeding male of the Wenaha pack in 2012.   OR12  is the first wolf confirmed to have been born into one pack in Oregon (Imnaha), then dispersed and successfully bred in a different Oregon pack.

OR16
OR16
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

November 2, 2012

OR16 radio-collared in Union County

On Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 ODFW biologists radio-collared a new wolf (OR16) in the Wenaha Unit of Northeast Oregon (Union County). The 85-pound yearling male was captured north of Elgin in an area that wolves were not previously known to occur. The wolf was captured incidentally by USDA APHIS-Wildlife Services personnel. Each year, ODFW issues an Incidental Take Permit to Wildlife Services which contains provisions to minimize the risk of incidental captures and to protect wolves if incidentally captured. The permit requires close coordination between the two agencies and in this situation the result was a successfully collared wolf released in excellent health.  It is unknown at this time if the wolf is part of any of the three known nearby packs (Wenaha, Walla Walla and Umatilla River) or if it represents new wolf activity. Biologists expect that the new GPS collar will soon provide that answer.

Photo of OR16.

October 15, 2012

On Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012 ODFW biologists re-captured OR10 from the Walla Walla Pack. The yearling female wolf weighed 73 lbs and was in excellent condition. She had been previously captured as a pup in October of 2011 and was fitted with a VHF telemetry collar at that time.  On this capture her telemetry collar was replaced with a GPS collar which will assist ODFW in gathering much needed location data on this pack.

September 20, 2012

More wolf depredation

ODFW recently investigated two reported wolf depredations in northeast Oregon. One was confirmed as a wolf and one was determined a “probable wolf”.

Summaries of the investigations are here:

This page defines the criteria for a “probable” wolf determination.   
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/livestock_loss_investigations.asp

September 14, 2012

Wolf depredation investigations

ODFW investigated two reported wolf depredations earlier this week—one in Wallowa, one in Union County. The one in Wallowa County was found to be a “probable” wolf depredation while the one in Union County was determined “possible/unknown.”

The summary reports are posted at the link below, which also defines the “probable” and “possible/unknown” determinations.

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/livestock_loss_investigations.asp

September 10, 2012 - Pups for Walla Walla pack

ODFW confirmed pups for the Walla Walla Pack on Friday, Sept. 7 when ODFW monitoring cameras documented two black pups travelling with the pack in the upper Walla Walla River drainage. Though reproduction was expected for this pack, it had not been confirmed until Friday. The two radio-collared yearlings (OR10 and OR11) were also documented to still be with the pack. This brings the minimum known size of the Walla Walla pack to 10 wolves (8 adults, 2 pups). It also brings the known number of reproducing wolf packs in NE Oregon to six.

ODFW also recently confirmed additional livestock losses by the Imnaha wolf pack. Details at the links below:

August 30, 2012 - New Upper Minam River wolf pack

A new wolf pack was discovered by ODFW wolf program staff in northeast Oregon on Aug. 25 when a pair of gray-colored adult wolves with five gray pups was observed in the Upper Minam River drainage. ODFW has received irregular wolf reports in the general larger area over the past several years.  ODFW had been monitoring wolf activity in the Lower Minam River area since a photo of a black lactating female was taken on June 4. However, these new wolves appear to be unrelated to the lactating female as they were all gray-colored. The home range of these newly discovered wolves is unknown at this time, but represents the fifth litter of pups documented in 2012.

Umatilla River wolf pups
Umatilla River wolf pups
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

August 15, 2012 - Umatilla River wolves  

Pictures taken Aug. 2, 2012 from an ODFW remote camera show that there are at least two wolf pups with the Umatilla River pair. With four individuals in the group, it is now considered a pack.

August 9, 2012 - Wenaha Pack pup count

ODFW surveyed the Wenaha pack on Aug 9, 2012 and was able to document seven pups for the pack.

Second wolf in Sled Springs Unit

A second wolf (black) has been confirmed by ODFW in the Sled Springs unit.  Surveys will continue in this area and hunter reports may help us learn more about local wolf activity as the fall progresses.

July 20, 2012 - Photo captured of wolf in Sled Springs Unit

Sled Springs Wolf
Sled Springs Wolf
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

An image of one wolf was taken by ODFW on July 20, 2012 in the Washboard Ridge area north of Enterprise (Sled Springs Wildlife Management Unit, Wallowa County). Tracks of two wolves were confirmed in this area over the winter and spring, so this may be an area of resident wolf activity. 

Summary of genetic results from recently tested wolf samples in NE Oregon.

  • A scat collected in the Chesnimnus unit (Devils Run area) on May 2, 2012 was from a wolf that was born in the Wenaha Pack.  It is unknown if the wolf is resident in the Chesnimnus unit or was simply passing through the area.  It is possible that this is the wolf using the Sled Springs unit (mentioned above).
  • OR12 (Wenaha Pack, captured on April 2, 2012) is progeny of the Imnaha pack (OR2 and OR4). OR12 is believed to be the breeding male for the Wenaha Pack and ODFW is currently testing Wenaha pup scats to confirm.
  • The pups captured and collared last fall in the Walla Walla Pack (OR10 and OR11) are full siblings and are not closely related to any other Oregon wolves sampled to date.

July 19, 2012 - Eagle Cap Wilderness wolf

In late June, ODFW surveyed an area east of the Minam River in the Eagle Cap Wilderness after a remote camera took an image of a lactating female on June 4.  At least three adult wolves were confirmed through tracks, scats and howls but no sign of pups was found. A later visit on July 19 found no wolf sign or remote camera photos, so the wolves are believed to have moved out of this immediate area.

July 08, 2012 - Imnaha pack pup count

The Imnaha Pack has at least six pups this year, a July 8 survey on US Forest Service lands southeast of Joseph found. There may be more pups but this is the most up-to-date number for the pack. (See photo of pups)  

Umatilla River wolf pair have pups

ODFW surveys also confirmed that the Umatilla River wolf pair have pups. Multiple tracks were found during a summer survey but the exact number of pups is still unknown.

July 03, 2012 - ODFW successfully captured and radio-collared a wolf of the Snake River Pack

ODFW successfully captured and radio-collared a wolf of the Snake River Pack yesterday (Aug. 2, 2012), the first collar for this pack. The 49-lb male pup was in excellent condition and was of  a size which could easily handle the lightweight VHF collar. The collar will allow ODFW to monitor the pack in this remote portion of Oregon.

Snake River Wolf Pack Howling
-Video by ODFW-

July 01, 2012 - Pups and wolf howling video for Snake River pack

The Snake River pack has at least three pups, a July 25, 2012 survey found. Photos taken by remote camera also show at least three adults in the pack.

During this survey in the Summit Ridge area of the Snake River wildlife management unit in Wallowa County, an ODFW employee also captured video footage of one of the pups howling and other members of the pack returning the howl. See the video here. Wolves are highly social animals and howling is a common behavior that helps packs communicate and stay together. Wolf howls can be heard from several miles away.

July 27, 2012 - Depredation by Imnaha Pack

Yesterday evening, ODFW investigated a severely injured calf on a national forestland grazing allotment in the Morgan Butte area (Wallowa County) and has confirmed it as a wolf depredation (Imnaha Pack). The cattle in this forested area had been moved earlier yesterday and the calf was believed to have been attacked during the daytime following that move. This morning the calf is alive but is not expected to survive due to its injuries.  An investigation summary will be posted next week.

June 27, 2012 - New wolf activity (lactating female) in Eagle Cap Wilderness

On June 25, ODFW received a trail-cam photograph of a lactating female wolf in the Eagle Cap Wilderness. The image was captured on June 4 on a camera placed by a research biologist as part of another wildlife research project. The wolf was not in an area of known wolf activity (e.g. is not believed to be part of a known wolf pack). The photo clearly shows that reproduction has occurred, but the current location and number of wolves in this area is unknown at this time. ODFW will survey the area to try and gather additional information.

OR-14
OR14
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

June 20, 2012 - OR14 GPS collared

OR14, a wolf using the northern Mt Emily wildlife management unit, was GPS collared by ODFW in the Weston Mountain area north of the Umatilla River on June 20. The gray-colored male wolf weighed 90 pounds and was estimated to be at least 6 years old. The collared wolf is believed to be responsible for the early May depredations of sheep in the area. The new collar will allow ODFW to better understand his movements and use additional tools to help prevent further depredation. It will also help ODFW communicate with area livestock producers about his whereabouts. OR14 is one of two known adult wolves in the area, and though reproduction is suspected, ODFW has not yet confirmed pups for these wolves.

June 10, 2012 - Wenaha wolf OR13 collared

ODFW trapped OR-13, a 2-year-old wolf of the Wenaha pack, and fitted her with a GPS radio-collar on June 10. The black female weighed 85 pounds and was captured in the Wenaha Wildlife Management Unit. She was previously caught as a pup in August 2010, but at the time was too small for a radio collar.

May 30, 2012 - Imnaha, Wenaha packs have pups

Biologists observed at least four pups in the Wenaha pack on May 30. In June, reproduction was also confirmed in the Imnaha pack, with a minimum of four pups observed.

ODFW changed from a monthly reporting format to Wolf Program Updates.

January 2012 Wolf Update

2011

2011 Annual Report – Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan

December 2011 Wolf Update

November 2011 Wolf Update

October 2011 Wolf Update

September 2011 Wolf Update

August 2011 Wolf Update

July 2011 Wolf Update

June 2011 Wolf Update

May 2011 Wolf Update

April 2011 Wolf Update

March 2011 Wolf Update

February 2011 Wolf Update

January 2011 Wolf Update

Female wolf

2010

December 2010 Wolf Update

November 2010 Wolf Update

September-October 2010 Wolf Update

November 2009-January 2010 Wolf Update

2010 Oregon information from report (pdf)

US Fish and Wildlife Service: Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery 2010 Interagency Annual Report

2009

October-November 2009 Wolf Update

August-September 2009 Wolf Update

July 2009 Wolf Update

June 2009 Wolf Update

April - May 2009 Wolf Update

March 2009 Wolf Update

February 2009 Wolf Update

January 2009 Wolf Update

2009 Oregon information from report (pdf)

US Fish and Wildlife Service: Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery 2009 Interagency Annual Report

OR-1

2006-2008

December 2008 Wolf Update

November 2008 Wolf Update

ODFW March 7, 2007 testimony to USFWS on federal delisting

Wolf Management Plan - 2006 Annual Report

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