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ODFW WEEKLY RECREATION REPORT
Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing
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Northwest Zone Map

Weekly Recreation Report: Northwest Zone

June 20, 2017

 Northwest Zone Fishing

2017 Family Fishing at McNary Ponds
A nice trout
-Photo by Kathy Munsel-

Weekend fishing opportunities:

  • Trout season is open on rivers and streams with a two fish per day limit.
  • Spring Chinook fishing is picking on up in coastal waters, including the Siletz.

Send us your fishing report

We’d love to hear about your recent fishing experiences. Send us your own fishing report through ODFW Fishing Reports ― the information will be forwarded to the local biologist who may use it to update various ODFW resources such as the Weekly Recreation Report.

NORTH COAST LAKES

Most of the North Coast lakes were stocked with trout recently. Trout stocking is over until the fall, but there still should be plenty of fish around to catch. Water temps are great and fish should be hungry, so go catch them!

MID COAST LAKES

Most of the North Coast lakes were stocked with trout recently. Water temps are great and fish should be hungry, so go catch them!

Stocking of Mid Coast lakes has ended for the year. The 2017 trout stocking schedule is available online.

ALSEA RIVER: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

KILCHIS RIVER: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

NEHALEM: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

NESTUCCA RIVER AND THREE RIVERS: steelhead, spring Chinook, trout

Spring Chinook fishing has been slow to fair on the Nestucca, depending on the day. There’s more water than usual for this time of year, but the river is still getting low. Concentrating effort in the lower River will probably produce the best results. Bobber fishing bait, back bouncing, pulling divers and bait or plugs are all good techniques. Summer steelhead are available throughout the system, and a few are being caught.

Spring Chinook fishing on Three Rivers has been slow. There are some fish being caught, but the action is sporadic. There are also a few summer steelhead being caught. Anglers are reminded that “Anti-Snagging Gear Restrictions” (page 16 of the Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations) are in effect from May 1 to July 15, and from the Cedar Creek Hatchery deadline to the marker downstream of Gauldy Mtn. Road Bridge is youth fishing only (ages 17 and under) from June 1 to July 15.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

SALMON RIVER: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.
Fishing the Siletz
Fishing on the Siletz River
-Photo by Andy Walgamott-

SILETZ RIVER: steelhead, Chinook, trout

The Siletz River opened for wild Chinook on April 1 (1 per day and 2 per season). Spring Chinook and summer steelhead are being caught, and fishing should improve through the end of the month. Casting spinners, drifting bait or using a bobber and jig can be effective.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

SIUSLAW RIVER: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

TILLAMOOK BAY: spring Chinook

Spring Chinook fishing on the bay has been slow and sporadic, but a few fish are being caught both in the upper and lower bay. Fishing should improve throughout the month. Trolling herring in the lower bay, and spinners in the upper, are usually the go to techniques.

TRASK RIVER: steelhead, spring Chinook, trout

Spring Chinook fishing on the Trask has been fair to slow. There are fish throughout the system, and there is plenty of water for this time of year.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded that from Cedar Creek boat slide (River Mile 10.9) downstream to marker at Loren’s drift (River Mile 9.0) from May 1 – July 31, angling is restricted to fly-fishing or salmon bobber fishing (see diagram on page 16 of the Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations).

WILSON RIVER: steelhead, Spring Chinook, trout

Spring Chinook fishing has been slow on the Wilson. There are summer steelhead in the system, and fishing pressure is very light.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

YAQUINA RIVER: trout

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

  Northwest Zone Hunting

OPEN: COUGAR

Cougar are most effectively taken by using predator calls. However, cougar densities are relatively low on the north coast. Successful hunters, remember you must check in cougar (hide and skull) at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring them in unfrozen. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging.

 Northwest Zone Wildlife Viewing

Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Area

Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Area
-Photo by Kathy Munsel, ODFW-

Young birds of many species are fledging right now and attentive parents are very active in foraging to speed nestlings’ growth or potentially bring off a second brood if conditions warrant. One excellent place to see a large number of species is the Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge due to the variety of habitats present on the site.

Local waterfowl that have nested on area estuaries, lakes and wetlands are out and about with their broods. Canada geese and mallards can be found along quiet backwaters in bays; look for wood ducks and hooded merganser broods at smaller, tree-lined ponds.

Birds aren’t the only wildlife with young to attend to this time of year. Many mammals will have offspring with them as they forage in early summer. Mammal viewing can be challenging – the best times are very early morning and late evening near forest edges and water features and most mammals are far less numerous than birds at any location. Pre-scouting will pay off for the hopeful photographer to help find tracks, scat and other sign along trails and areas of higher activity to help focus effort.

TILLAMOOK COUNTY

Nesting colonies for various sea birds are in full swing along nearly every rocky outcrop along the coast. Pelagic cormorants and pigeon guillemots are commonly seen along cliffs and near-shore rocks while murres, puffins and auklets typically nest a bit further offshore. One interaction that occurs at many of these colonies is predation from bald eagles and peregrine falcons. A good spotting scope is a must in order to view this predator/prey relationship at someplace like Three Arch Rocks but apparently eagles have been seen hunting the steep cliff faces where cormorants typically nest onshore.

CLATSOP COUNTY

The Feldenheimer Forest Trail is located at the end of Sunset Blvd in Seaside. Turn west on Ave U, then left on Edgewood Dr. and follow the road to the end. A 4-mile trail winds though spruce/hemlock forest and eventually reaches Ecola State Park. Warblers, thrushes and towhees should be present in the forest and a variety of seabirds can be viewed from shore, perhaps including marbled murrelet. Harbor seals and even whales may be viewed depending on time of year from viewpoints along the trail or from Indian Beach at trail’s end.

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area

Best times for viewing elk are in the mornings and evenings. As the summer progresses, elk are spending more time in the timbered areas and less time in the open fields especially on warm days. New antler growth is evident on bulls. Look for bulls on the Fishhawk tract adjacent to Hwy. 202. Other elk may be visible along Hwy. 202 or the first 1.5 miles on Beneke Creek Road. Cows should have calves at heel by mid-June. Please remember that areas posted as Wildlife Refuge are closed to public access.

Migratory species that can be viewed on the wildlife area include band-tailed pigeons, violet-green swallows, tree swallows, and wood ducks. Look for band-tailed pigeons near viewing areas. Swallows can be seen gliding over open fields and checking out nest boxes along fences near viewing areas. Wood ducks, hooded mergansers, and mallards have been seen on the shallow pond areas, in fields with standing water, and along creeks.

Wildlife Area Parking Permits are required on the Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area.

(Updated 6/12/17)


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